Category Archives: Special Needs

Homeschooling is perfect for special needs children and teens because of the ability to customize the methods and pace. Gifted children can move more quickly, and students with learning challenges can take longer where needed.

Can Parents Who Have ADHD Homeschool Their Children?

When I visit homeschool blogs, I see parents who have it all together.  Some have great tips for how to fill out a planner. Those parents have confidence that once the planner is filled, it’s going to be fairly accurate … Continue reading

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Can I Homeschool My Child Who Has ADHD?

Children with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) present a special challenge to new homeschooling parents. The differences between a child with ADHD and a child without lead to very different learning styles which require unique teaching techniques. However, homeschooling comes … Continue reading

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How a Literature-Rich Homeschool Works for a Child with Dyslexia

"Sonlight has given Eli a love for books despite his dyslexia. Reading aloud is the highlight of our day. Audio books are a must in our house. I could never read aloud as many books as he devours. Thank you, … Continue reading

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How to Homeschool the Auditory Learner

Are you homeschooling a child who struggles with reading comprehension? Perhaps they struggle with or show the signs of a visual processing disorder such as dyslexia. They might wear glasses or have trouble seeing. Perhaps they just don’t like reading … Continue reading

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How to Homeschool the Visual-Linguistic and Visual-Spatial Learner

Do you have a child who struggles with listening and understanding while you read aloud? Would they prefer to read the material themselves instead? Do they need to write down what they are thinking in order to remember it best? … Continue reading

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How to Homeschool the Tactile, Movement-Oriented, and Sensory-Seeking Child

In a classroom setting, highly kinesthetic or sensory-seeking children are notoriously difficult to teach because they have a deep-rooted need to perform actions generally considered distracting for the rest of the classroom. Those actions involve moving and touching, and they … Continue reading

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4 Ways to Coax Your Reluctant Writer Out of Blank Page Paralysis

"I love how the Language Arts curriculum allows students to be creative while still teaching them the basics of writing and grammar. The organization of the teacher binder allows me the freedom to follow the outline without needing to spend … Continue reading

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